You are currently browsing the monthly archive for June 2010.

I’ve found the best quote in this article to be “Unless a company can connect diversity to business goals, it’s tough to keep investing in it.”

The only real business solution to diversity is to 1) recognize the differences, 2) link those differences to one’s own behavior and 3) integrate this behavioral change into business processes. This way it is possible to use the differences inherent in diversity to generate added value. This makes diversity investment a true investment that delivers returns, rather than a cost. Even more importantly, it justifies even more investment when times are tough, rather than reduction.

Read more: The business case for diversity – Washington Business Journal

This question was placed on De Baak International’s LinkedIn Group page in reference to the Dutch doing business with Indians. Armijn Peltekian of NexusNovus gave a detailed, very complete and, in my opinion, spot-on answer that deserves a wider audience. I’ve reprinted it below:

__________________

[It] is of great importance to understand the socio-cultural differences that exist between the two countries. However, India is immensely multicultural with a large number religions, castes, sub-castes and regional differences. To generalize all Indians as equal in terms of politeness, humility and sensitivity would be an error. In my opinion the most important lesson to be learnt is that since you have to deal with a vast array of cultural differences, your approach needs to be tweaked on a case-to-case basis.
Experience is crucial when conducting business in India. SME’s in general neither have the required in-house experience, nor can they afford to hire an experienced expat to conduct business functions for them on location. The task of facilitating an effective entry into India would prove to be extremely challenging to them.
MNC’s too, face a number of problems, particularly in management styles. Deputing an inexperienced expat to carry out necessary business functions in India very often fails to generate expected results. This boils down to the cultural differences as mentioned by [a previous respondent]. A very direct style of management might be counter-productive. The cost perspective of Dutch managers is quite off from the point of view of the existing reality as costs are generally much lower in these regions. However, many managers fail to understand the extent to which the costs are lower. In India, it would be a grave error to come across as one who gives in to unnecessary splurges. To pay “too much” for something is a sign of weakness. Hindustan Lever (now Unilever), McDonalds and Maruti-Suzuki, have attained their position of success due to the fact that they have completely Indianized their functions and processes.
[The original question] however questions whether the Dutch will have the skill sets to compete in a new (flat?) world. In my opinion, the greater majority of people in Europe lack the skill sets required to conduct business efficiently in Asia. But with the rise of the new economies there will be a large premium on people who have acquired these skill-sets and this will result in adjustments/ training for people currently lacking those skill-sets. If one takes some historical aspects into consideration, throughout past centuries the Dutch have been able to trade with many different Asian and African countries as well as all different cultures contained within Europe. If that teaches us anything, it shows us that these skills-sets can be acquired.
To conclude, India is extremely multi-cultural, multi-ethnic and multi-religious. Your approach needs to be custom designed on a case-to-case basis, and to do this, one requires a great deal of experience. Entry into India can be tough for SME’s due to cost restraints and lack of experience. MNCs do face hardships as well due to the large cultural difference that exist, as mentioned by [the previous respondent]. I also feel that Europe currently has a lesser focus on India than America does. Outsourcing and the flat world are well known concepts in those regions. Europe has not yet been exposed to India to the extent that America has, but that is rapidly changing. I fail to recognise any factors that would inhibit The Netherlands in any attempt to reap the benefits of lower sourcing costs and tremendous market potential of India.

After seeing the shocking number of Dutchmen and women who voted yesterday for the PVV and their representative Geert Wilders, and after hearing his unbelievably shocking words during his victory speech, I thought it perhaps prudent to remind those to whose country I contribute substantially to their tax base, of not a small thing called their “Constitution.” To wit, Article 1:

Allen die zich in Nederland bevinden, worden in gelijke gevallen gelijk behandeld. Discriminatie wegens godsdienst, levensovertuiging, politieke gezindheid, ras, geslacht of op welke grond dan ook, is niet toegestaan.”

In the Queen’s English:

“All residents of the Netherlands will in all cases be treated equally. It is not allowed to discriminate on the basis of religion, lifestyle, political persuasion, race, sex or for any other reason.”

That is all.

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,294 other followers

Profile pic

Leo Salazar

Leo’s tweet feed

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.